Auckland: Report On Recruitment and Retention

July 29th, 2010

The International Migration, Settlement, and Employment Dynamics (IMSED) Research Team is responsible for the Department of Labour’s research on, and evaluation of, immigration and settlement issues facing New Zealand in a globally competitive environment.

IMSED recently released a report based on a survey of New Zealand employers about the benefits and challenges of hiring migrants and the factors that contribute to their retention.

A total of 942 employers from Immigration NZ’s database took part in the survey and below are the key findings.

• More than four-fifths (87 percent) of employers said they rated their migrant employees as good or very good.

• Employers who had tried to find a New Zealander before hiring a migrant reported not being able to find someone with the right skills (83 percent) as the main reason they didn’t hire a New Zealander.

• Employers reported that language difficulties are the greatest challenge and most common issue when hiring a migrant (43 percent).

• Almost half (44 percent) of migrants that had left an employer in the previous 12 months had worked there longer than 12 months, whilst 17 percent had worked there less than 6 months.

• The most common reason for a migrant leaving was to return to their country of origin (23 percent).

Justin Treagus, the CEO of OMEGA added a comment on these findings, saying, “What stands out to me is that eighty five percent of those who had employed a migrant in the last 12 months had tried to find a New Zealander to fill the position. Those who had tried to find a New Zealander first reported not being able to find someone with the right skills (83 percent) as the main reason they didn’t hire a New Zealander.

These findings support the view of many skilled migrants that there is a significant disconnect between earning the right to work in New Zealand, and finding the right work in New Zealand. 85 percent of migrants hired by this group in the last year were at first ignored while business tried to find a New Zealander to fill the role. Despite these employers actively looking for local skills, 83 percent of these employers could not find the right skills to fill the role – a sure sign that NZ’s skills shortage remains very real. As the economy picks up and the demand for international talent intensifies through demographic changes, businesses will need to significantly shift their thinking and practices with regard to employing migrant employees.”

To view the full report please see:  Employers of Migrant Survey 2009: From Recruitment to Retention

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