Webinar: Retaining Global Talent: Making Connections with International Students

February 19, 2014


Halifax - Connector Program

Join Cities of Migration to learn about initiatives in Auckland and Halifax that recognize the potential of international students to meet local labour needs and strengthen emerging talent pools. What can smart cities and local institutions do to recruit and retain these promising young people and global citizens?Committee for Auckland

This webinar is co-hosted with Committee for Auckland

 

Watch the Webinar Video

 Resources

  • Download the Presentation Slides (PDF)
  • Video: Question and Answer (Q&A) with speakers, Fred Morley, Executive Vice President and Chief Economist of the Greater Halifax Partnership (Halifax) and Paul Spoonley, Pro Vice-Chancellor, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Massey University (Auckland)

Featured Good Ideas

  • In Auckland, New Zealand, the Auckland Tertiary Education Network (ATEN) was launched in 2012 as a key component of the city’s Economic Development Strategy. ATEN develops partnerships with local universities with a mission to bolster Auckland’s ‘export education’ sector, retain international student graduates, and increase Auckland’s innovation quotient.
  • In Halifax, Canada, The Connector Program was developed by the Greater Halifax Partnership to recruit, retain and develop the potential of internationally trained professionals by connecting newcomers to established members of the community and their networks. In response to strong employer interest, the Program was successfully expanded to tap into the international student market to broaden the Halifax region’s talent pool.

Speakers

Fred MorleyFred Morley, Executive Vice President and Chief Economist of the Greater Halifax Partnership (Halifax)

Fred Morley is Executive Vice President and Chief Economist of the Greater Halifax Partnership. Mr. Morley has designed and driven many of Nova Scotia’s and Halifax’s high profile economic and business initiatives, several of which have won international economic development awards. He is a regular media commentator and the author of more than 100 articles on economic issues. His views are sought by organizations, companies and governments around the world.

PPaul Spoonleyaul Spoonley, Pro Vice-Chancellor, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Massey University (Auckland)

Distinguished Professor Paul Spoonley is one of New Zealand’s leading academics and a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand. He is the Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Massey University. He has led numerous externally funded research programmes, including the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s $3.2 million Integration of Immigrants Programme and the $800,000 Nga Tangata Oho Mairangi. He has written or edited 25 books and is a regular commentator in the news media. In 2010, he was a Fulbright Senior Scholar at the University of California Berkeley where he conducted research on American-born Latino identities and in 2013, a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Max Planck Institute of Religious and Ethnic Diversity in Göttingen. He was awarded the Royal Society of New Zealand Science and Technology medal in 2009 in recognition of his academic scholarship, leadership and public contribution to cultural understanding.


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